The City of Hannibal will soon begin weeding out the issues regarding sale of medical marijuana.

The issue stems from voter approval in November, 2018 of a statewide initiative known as Amendment 2. The initiative passed by a margin of 65 to 35%. It allows doctors in Missouri to prescribe limited amounts of cannabis for patients with certain diseases. Sales would be taxed at 4%.

A request has been received to adjust commercial zones in the City and determine appropriate locations for medical marijuana cultivation, sales and use.

The Planning and Zoning Commission will hold a public hearing on zoning changes at 4 p.m. Thursday, March 28. The council approved a public hearing on the request to be held at 6:45 p.m. Tuesday, April 2, just prior to the regular council meeting.

Mayor James Hark says the City has received four requests for information regarding establishment of a medical marijuana-related business. Hark says the city will proactively address the issue and establish appropriate guidelines that comport with Missouri law.

Other issues approved by the City Council Tuesday evening:

SEWER ORDINANCES UPDATED DUE TO DEFICIENCIES

Heath Hall of the Board of Public Works received approval to update sewer ordinances pertaining to pretreatment. MoDNR and the EPA found deficiencies regarding pretreatment operations of four large industrial customers. City Attorney James Lemon says the changes are comprehensive, and appropriate. Hall says nearly all the changes are upgrades recommended by DNR and EPA. There will be a final approval process on the modifications.

AMEREN TO INCREASE  ELECTRICAL FACILITY CHARGES

Changes in BPW's wholesale electrical contract with Ameren will see monthly facility charges increase from $19,912 to $33,517. Hannibal electrical customers receive power from two sources tied into the Ameren transmission system: the Marion Station near Mark Twain Cave, and West Switch Station near the Rocket Truck Stop west of Hannibal. BPW General Manager Heath Hall says the increased charges are for maintenance costs and construction services to upgrade relays at the Marion Substation. Hall says there is no wholesale facility charge for the West Switch Station, since the BPW paid $2.2 million outright for site construction  in 2009.

HANNIBAL HISTORY MUSEUM REQUESTS FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE

Ken Marks of the Hannibal History Museum. Marks told the council the free museum not only promotes Hannibal history, but serves as marketing tool for the city. Marks says the museum on North Main Street sees 20.000 to 25,000 visitors a year. Funds currently come from the Steampunk Festival and donations, but Marks says the non-profit enterprise has been running negative balances since 2014. He also says obtaining grants has been difficult since many are contingent on cash-matching. The council took no immediate action on Marks’ request for $14.000-$18.000. Mayor Hark said the request would be discussed at upcoming budget planning meetings, and such a partnership would need further evaluation by City Attorney James Lemon.

CITY SCORES 100% ON RISK MANAGEMENT EVALUATION

City Honored for Loss Prevention Efforts

Jeff Arp of MIRMA, who administers the City’s self-insured property, casualty, liability, and Workmen’s Comp coverage, awarded the city a plaque for scoring 100% on the 2019 risk management safety evaluation. Arp credited all the department heads and employees for promoting safety in the workplace.

DATES SET FOR BIG SUMMER EVENTS

Street closures are approved for National Tom Sawyer Days events in the downtown area, from June 29 to July 6, and the 43rd Annual Arts and Crafts Festival in Central Park set for July 2-6.
Street closures also approved for 6th Annual Steampunk Festival August 30 to Sept. 2, pending insurance certificate.