That was a pretty crazy severe storm we had this weekend which produced a ton of rain, but also an amazing lightning show.

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caught on camera in Frankford, Missouri was a lightning show like no other. It looks like Christmas lights going on and off in the sky. You can see it just looks like icicles raining down from the sky. The storm also produced several tornados in Missouri, which never made it close to the Tri-States, but we were under a Tonroda Warning for most of the day.

I know the storm was dangerous at times, but there is beauty in a storm that rolled through the Tri-States this weekend. According to the nationalgeographic.com site,

Lightning is an electrical discharge caused by imbalances between storm clouds and the ground, or within the clouds themselves. Most lightning occurs within the clouds...Lightning is extremely hot—a flash can heat the air around it to temperatures five times hotter than the sun’s surface.

There were definitely a ton of electrical charges happening yesterday and Saturday Night. Some brave souls were able to capture some of the tornados that took place over the weekend, and those videos are amazing as well. Tornados in October are not uncommon. Last year alone there were six tornados confirmed with one as last as October 28th. Torandas can happen all year round, and according to the Weather Channel, October and November comprise the second half of the tornado season.

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