If you want to get to the highest natural point in the Land of Lincoln this year you're running out of time because it is on private property, seriously we aren't making this up!

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Illinois is a very very very flat state, so flat in fact that the tallest building in Illinois, the Willis Tower standing at 1,454 ft tall is actually taller than the highest natural point in Illinois which is Charles Mound at 1,235ft above sea level, and if you want to get to the top of Charles Mound you have to do it soon because the season for exploring the mound is ending.

According to enjoyillinois.com...

"At 1,235 feet above sea level, Charles Mound is the highest natural point in Illinois. Located 11 miles north of the Mississippi River town of Galena, Charles Mound shines a light on the geological history of Illinois. The northwest region of Illinois was not covered by glaciers during the last Ice Age, which has resulted in a unique feature: a tall plateau cut by deep river valleys, most notably around the Mississippi River."

But if you want to actually visit the mound and enjoy the beautiful views around it, you have to do it on special weekends because technically Charles Mound is on private property, according to alltrails.com they say...

"Please note that it is located on private property. Public access is limited to the first weekends of June, July, August, and September. There is no fee to enter on these weekends."

How funny is that? The tallest point in Illinois is so unimpressive that it is actually just a part of someone's property, unlike a giant mountain in a national park, Illinois has a mound near the Mississippi River on some private property that is shorter than its tallest building.

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